Matching articles for "SNRIs"

Gepirone (Exxua) for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 24, 2024;  (Issue 1705)
The FDA has approved an oral extended-release formulation of gepirone (Exxua – Fabre-Kramer), a selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist, for treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults. Gepirone was...
The FDA has approved an oral extended-release formulation of gepirone (Exxua – Fabre-Kramer), a selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist, for treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults. Gepirone was originally developed decades ago for treatment of anxiety and depression, but it was not approved by the FDA for such use. Gepirone is structurally related to buspirone, which is FDA-approved for treatment of anxiety.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2024 Jun 24;66(1705):97-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Zuranolone (Zurzuvae) – An Oral Drug for Postpartum Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 25, 2023;  (Issue 1692)
The FDA has approved the oral GABAA receptor modulator zuranolone (Zurzuvae – Sage Therapeutics/Biogen) for treatment of postpartum depression (PPD). Zuranolone is the second drug to be approved for this...
The FDA has approved the oral GABAA receptor modulator zuranolone (Zurzuvae – Sage Therapeutics/Biogen) for treatment of postpartum depression (PPD). Zuranolone is the second drug to be approved for this indication; brexanolone (Zulresso), another GABAA receptor modulator, was approved for IV treatment of PPD in 2019.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2023 Dec 25;65(1692):201-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 11, 2023;  (Issue 1691)
A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) is generally used for initial treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). A serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), bupropion (Wellbutrin SR,...
A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) is generally used for initial treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). A serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), bupropion (Wellbutrin SR, and others), and mirtazapine (Remeron, and others) are reasonable alternatives. Improvement in symptoms can occur within the first two weeks of treatment with these drugs, but a substantial benefit may not be achieved for 4-8 weeks.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2023 Dec 11;65(1691):193-200 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Anxiety Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 7, 2023;  (Issue 1682)
Anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and various phobias) are the most common form of psychiatric illness. They can be treated effectively with...
Anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and various phobias) are the most common form of psychiatric illness. They can be treated effectively with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and/or pharmacotherapy.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2023 Aug 7;65(1682):121-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Fezolinetant (Veozah) for Menopausal Vasomotor Symptoms

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 26, 2023;  (Issue 1679)
Fezolinetant (Veozah – Astellas), a first-in-class neurokinin 3 (NK3) receptor antagonist, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms (VMS) due to menopause. It is...
Fezolinetant (Veozah – Astellas), a first-in-class neurokinin 3 (NK3) receptor antagonist, has been approved by the FDA for treatment of moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms (VMS) due to menopause. It is the second nonhormonal treatment to be approved in the US for this indication; a low-dose formulation of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine mesylate (Brisdelle) was approved in 2013.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2023 Jun 26;65(1679):97-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Migraine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 12, 2023;  (Issue 1678)
An oral nonopioid analgesic is often sufficient for acute treatment of mild to moderate migraine pain without severe nausea or vomiting. A triptan is the drug of choice for treatment of moderate to...
An oral nonopioid analgesic is often sufficient for acute treatment of mild to moderate migraine pain without severe nausea or vomiting. A triptan is the drug of choice for treatment of moderate to severe migraine in most patients without vascular disease. Treatment of pain when it is still mild to moderate in intensity improves headache response and reduces the risk of recurrence.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2023 Jun 12;65(1678):89-96 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Table: Some Drugs for Migraine Prevention in Adults (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 12, 2023;  (Issue 1678)
...
View the Comparison Table: Some Drugs for Migraine Prevention in Adults
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2023 Jun 12;65(1678):e100-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Dextromethorphan/Bupropion (Auvelity) for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 26, 2022;  (Issue 1666)
The FDA has approved an extended-release fixed-dose combination of dextromethorphan and bupropion (Auvelity – Axsome) for treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in...
The FDA has approved an extended-release fixed-dose combination of dextromethorphan and bupropion (Auvelity – Axsome) for treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Dec 26;64(1666):201-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Nonopioid Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • March 7, 2022;  (Issue 1645)
Nonopioid drugs can be used in the treatment of many nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. For severe pain, especially severe chronic cancer pain, use of opioids may be necessary....
Nonopioid drugs can be used in the treatment of many nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. For severe pain, especially severe chronic cancer pain, use of opioids may be necessary. Noninvasive nonpharmacologic treatments, including physical and psychological therapies, have been shown to improve pain and function in patients with some common chronic pain conditions and are unlikely to cause serious harms. A multimodal approach to analgesic therapy can increase pain control while reducing opioid use and adverse effects.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2022 Mar 7;64(1645):33-40 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Atogepant (Qulipta) for Migraine Prevention

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 1, 2021;  (Issue 1636)
Atogepant (Qulipta – Abbvie), an oral small-molecule calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist ("gepant"), has been approved by the FDA for prevention of episodic migraine in adults....
Atogepant (Qulipta – Abbvie), an oral small-molecule calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist ("gepant"), has been approved by the FDA for prevention of episodic migraine in adults. It is the second oral CGRP receptor antagonist to be approved in the US for this indication; the first was rimegepant (Nurtec ODT), which is also approved for acute treatment of migraine. Parenteral CGRP monoclonal antibodies are approved for prevention of migraine (see Table 3).
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Nov 1;63(1636):169-71 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Parkinson's Disease

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 22, 2021;  (Issue 1618)
The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are caused primarily by degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The nonmotor symptoms of the disease are thought to be caused by...
The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are caused primarily by degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The nonmotor symptoms of the disease are thought to be caused by degeneration of other neurotransmitter systems. No disease-modifying drugs are available for treatment of PD.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Feb 22;63(1618):25-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Pitolisant (Wakix) for Narcolepsy

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 8, 2021;  (Issue 1617)
The FDA has approved pitolisant (Wakix – Harmony), a histamine-3 (H3)-receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, for treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) or cataplexy in adults with narcolepsy. It is the...
The FDA has approved pitolisant (Wakix – Harmony), a histamine-3 (H3)-receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, for treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) or cataplexy in adults with narcolepsy. It is the first H3-receptor antagonist/inverse agonist to become available in the US and the first non-controlled substance to receive FDA approval for these indications. Pitolisant has been available in Europe since 2016.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2021 Feb 8;63(1617):19-21 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Migraine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 5, 2020;  (Issue 1608)
An oral nonopioid analgesic is often sufficient for acute treatment of mild to moderate migraine headache without severe nausea or vomiting. A triptan is the drug of choice for treatment of moderate to...
An oral nonopioid analgesic is often sufficient for acute treatment of mild to moderate migraine headache without severe nausea or vomiting. A triptan is the drug of choice for treatment of moderate to severe migraine headache pain in most patients without vascular disease. Early treatment of pain when it is still mild to moderate in intensity improves headache response and reduces the risk of recurrence.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Oct 5;62(1608):153-60 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Menopausal Symptoms

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 10, 2020;  (Issue 1604)
The primary symptoms of menopause are genitourinary (genitourinary syndrome of menopause; GSM) and vasomotor (VMS). Vulvovaginal atrophy can cause vaginal burning, irritation and dryness, dyspareunia,...
The primary symptoms of menopause are genitourinary (genitourinary syndrome of menopause; GSM) and vasomotor (VMS). Vulvovaginal atrophy can cause vaginal burning, irritation and dryness, dyspareunia, and dysuria, and increase the risk of urinary tract infections. Vasomotor symptoms ("hot flashes") cause daytime discomfort and night sweats that may disrupt sleep. Hormone therapy is the most effective treatment for both genitourinary and vasomotor symptoms.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Aug 10;62(1604):124-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Eptinezumab (Vyepti) for Migraine Prevention

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 2020;  (Issue 1599)
The FDA has approved eptinezumab-jjmr (Vyepti – Lundbeck), a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antagonist administered IV once every 3 months, for migraine prevention in adults. It is the fourth...
The FDA has approved eptinezumab-jjmr (Vyepti – Lundbeck), a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antagonist administered IV once every 3 months, for migraine prevention in adults. It is the fourth monoclonal antibody to be approved for this indication; erenumab (Aimovig), fremanezumab (Ajovy), and galcanezumab (Emgality), which are all given subcutaneously once monthly (fremanezumab can also be given once every 3 months), were approved earlier.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Jun 1;62(1599):85-7 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Osteoarthritis

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • April 20, 2020;  (Issue 1596)
Many different drugs are used for treatment of osteoarthritis pain, but none of them prevent progression of the disease. Nonpharmacologic approaches including weight management, exercise, tai chi, physical...
Many different drugs are used for treatment of osteoarthritis pain, but none of them prevent progression of the disease. Nonpharmacologic approaches including weight management, exercise, tai chi, physical therapy, assistive devices, and total joint arthroplasty can also be used. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has published new guidelines for the management of osteoarthritis of the hip, hand, and knee.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Apr 20;62(1596):57-62 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 24, 2020;  (Issue 1592)
Complete remission of symptoms is the goal of treatment for major depressive disorder; a partial response is associated with an increased risk of relapse. Improvement in symptoms can occur within the first...
Complete remission of symptoms is the goal of treatment for major depressive disorder; a partial response is associated with an increased risk of relapse. Improvement in symptoms can occur within the first two weeks of treatment with an antidepressant, but it may take 4-8 weeks to achieve a substantial benefit. Following successful treatment of a first major depressive episode, antidepressant treatment should be continued at the same dose for at least 4-9 months to consolidate recovery. In patients with recurrent depressive episodes, long-term maintenance treatment can reduce the risk of relapse.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2020 Feb 24;62(1592):25-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Anxiety Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 12, 2019;  (Issue 1578)
Anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and various phobias) are the most common form of psychiatric illness. They can be treated effectively with cognitive...
Anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and various phobias) are the most common form of psychiatric illness. They can be treated effectively with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and/or pharmacotherapy. Obsessive-compulsive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder are now considered separate entities in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5); they can also be treated with CBT and many of the same drugs.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Aug 12;61(1578):121-6 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Brexanolone (Zulresso) for Postpartum Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 6, 2019;  (Issue 1571)
The FDA has approved the GABAA receptor modulator brexanolone (Zulresso – Sage Therapeutics) for IV treatment of postpartum depression (PPD). Brexanolone is the first drug to be approved by the FDA for...
The FDA has approved the GABAA receptor modulator brexanolone (Zulresso – Sage Therapeutics) for IV treatment of postpartum depression (PPD). Brexanolone is the first drug to be approved by the FDA for this indication.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 May 6;61(1571):68-70 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Oxybutynin for Hot Flashes in Women with Breast Cancer

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 25, 2019;  (Issue 1566)
Interim results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial suggest that off-label use of the anticholinergic drug oxybutynin may reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes in women with breast...
Interim results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial suggest that off-label use of the anticholinergic drug oxybutynin may reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes in women with breast cancer. Extended-release oral oxybutynin (Ditropan XL, and generics) has been shown to reduce the frequency and severity of hot flashes in healthy menopausal women.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2019 Feb 25;61(1566):30-1 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Fremanezumab (Ajovy) and Galcanezumab (Emgality) for Migraine Prevention

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 5, 2018;  (Issue 1559)
The FDA has approved two subcutaneously injected calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antagonists, fremanezumab-vfrm (Ajovy – Teva) and galcanezumab-gnlm (Emgality – Lilly), for migraine prevention in...
The FDA has approved two subcutaneously injected calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antagonists, fremanezumab-vfrm (Ajovy – Teva) and galcanezumab-gnlm (Emgality – Lilly), for migraine prevention in adults. Fremanezumab and galcanezumab are the second and third subcutaneously injected monoclonal antibodies that target the CGRP pathway to be approved by the FDA for this indication; erenumab-aooe (Aimovig), which targets the CGRP receptor, was the first.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Nov 5;60(1559):177-80 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Erenumab (Aimovig) for Migraine Prevention

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 18, 2018;  (Issue 1549)
The FDA has approved erenumab-aooe (Aimovig – Amgen/Novartis), a once-monthly, subcutaneously-injected, monoclonal antibody against the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, for preventive...
The FDA has approved erenumab-aooe (Aimovig – Amgen/Novartis), a once-monthly, subcutaneously-injected, monoclonal antibody against the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, for preventive treatment of migraine in adults. It is the first drug in its class to be approved by the FDA.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Jun 18;60(1549):101-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Nonopioid Drugs for Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 12, 2018;  (Issue 1540)
Nonopioid drugs can be used in the treatment of many nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. Use of opioids for pain will be reviewed in a future...
Nonopioid drugs can be used in the treatment of many nociceptive and neuropathic pain conditions. Use of opioids for pain will be reviewed in a future issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2018 Feb 12;60(1540):24-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Migraine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 13, 2017;  (Issue 1514)
An oral nonopioid analgesic may be sufficient for treatment of mild to moderate migraine without severe nausea or vomiting. A triptan is the drug of choice for treatment of moderate to severe migraine. Use...
An oral nonopioid analgesic may be sufficient for treatment of mild to moderate migraine without severe nausea or vomiting. A triptan is the drug of choice for treatment of moderate to severe migraine. Use of a triptan early in an attack when pain is still mild to moderate in intensity improves headache response and reduces recurrence rates.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Feb 13;59(1514):27-32 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Comparison Table: Some Drugs for Migraine Prevention in Adults (online only)

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 13, 2017;  (Issue 1514)
...
View the Comparison Table: Some Drugs for Migraine Prevention in Adults
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2017 Feb 13;59(1514):e31-2 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Menopausal Symptoms

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • November 7, 2016;  (Issue 1507)
The primary symptoms of menopause are genitourinary and vasomotor. A thin, dry vaginal lining and thin urethral mucosa can cause vaginal and vulvar burning and irritation, pain during intercourse, and...
The primary symptoms of menopause are genitourinary and vasomotor. A thin, dry vaginal lining and thin urethral mucosa can cause vaginal and vulvar burning and irritation, pain during intercourse, and an increased risk of urinary tract infections. Vasomotor symptoms ("hot flashes") cause daytime discomfort and night sweats that may disrupt sleep.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Nov 7;58(1507):142-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 4, 2016;  (Issue 1498)
Complete remission of symptoms is the goal of antidepressant therapy; partial response is associated with an increased risk of relapse. Improvement can occur within the first two weeks of drug therapy, but...
Complete remission of symptoms is the goal of antidepressant therapy; partial response is associated with an increased risk of relapse. Improvement can occur within the first two weeks of drug therapy, but it may take 4-8 weeks to achieve a substantial benefit. Fewer than 50% of patients with depression respond to first-line pharmacotherapy, and the rate of response decreases with each subsequent drug trial. Following remission after a first episode of depression, many experts recommend continuing antidepressant treatment at the same dose for at least 6-12 months to consolidate recovery. For patients with recurrent depressive episodes, long-term maintenance therapy can reduce the risk of recurrence.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2016 Jul 4;58(1498):85-90 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Brexpiprazole (Rexulti) for Schizophrenia and Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 17, 2015;  (Issue 1475)
The FDA has approved the oral, once-daily, second-generation antipsychotic brexpiprazole (Rexulti – Otsuka/Lundbeck) for treatment of schizophrenia and as an adjunct to antidepressants for treatment of...
The FDA has approved the oral, once-daily, second-generation antipsychotic brexpiprazole (Rexulti – Otsuka/Lundbeck) for treatment of schizophrenia and as an adjunct to antidepressants for treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). Aripiprazole (Abilify), a structurally similar second-generation antipsychotic also comarketed by Otsuka (with BMS), recently became available generically.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2015 Aug 17;57(1475):116-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

In Brief: Khedezla - A New Brand of Desvenlafaxine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • January 6, 2014;  (Issue 1433)
The FDA has approved the marketing of another extended-release brand-name formulation of the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) desvenlafaxine (Khedezla – Par/Osmotica) for treatment of...
The FDA has approved the marketing of another extended-release brand-name formulation of the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) desvenlafaxine (Khedezla – Par/Osmotica) for treatment of depression. It is the third extended-release formulation of desvenlafaxine to become available in the US. Khedezla was approved using a 505(b)(2) application, a new drug application (NDA) that relies upon the FDA's findings of safety and/or effectiveness for a previously approved drug.

Khedezla does not appear to offer any advantage over the other extended-release formulations of desvenlafaxine. There is no evidence that any formulation of desvenlafaxine is more effective for treatment of depression than other SNRIs or any SSRI, which are available in less expensive generic formulations.1

1. Drugs for psychiatric disorders. Treat Guidel Med Lett 2013; 11:53.

Download complete U.S. English article

Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2014 Jan 6;56(1433):4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Migraine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • December 1, 2013;  (Issue 136)
Treatment of migraine in the emergency department, which may involve use of intravenous drugs, is not discussed...
Treatment of migraine in the emergency department, which may involve use of intravenous drugs, is not discussed here.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Dec;11(136):107-12 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Psychiatric Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 1, 2013;  (Issue 130)
Drugs are not the only treatment for psychiatric illness. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be used for many...
Drugs are not the only treatment for psychiatric illness. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be used for many of them as well. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has a long history of efficacy and safety when drugs are ineffective or cannot be used.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2013 Jun;11(130):53-64 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Adjunctive Antipsychotics for Major Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • September 19, 2011;  (Issue 1373)
Augmentation with a second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic is a treatment option for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) whose symptoms persist following antidepressant monotherapy. Aripiprazole...
Augmentation with a second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic is a treatment option for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) whose symptoms persist following antidepressant monotherapy. Aripiprazole (Abilify), olanzapine in a fixed-dose combination with fluoxetine (Symbyax), and extended-release quetiapine (Seroquel XR) have been approved by the FDA for such use.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 Sep 19;53(1373):74-5 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Duloxetine (Cymbalta) for Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 2, 2011;  (Issue 1363)
Previously approved by the FDA for treatment of depression, general anxiety disorder, diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia, duloxetine (Cymbalta – Lilly) has now also been approved...
Previously approved by the FDA for treatment of depression, general anxiety disorder, diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia, duloxetine (Cymbalta – Lilly) has now also been approved for treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2011 May 2;53(1363):33-4 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Migraine

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • February 1, 2011;  (Issue 102)
Drugs for treatment of migraine are listed in Table 2 on page 9. Drugs for prevention of migraine are listed in Table 3 on page 10. Treatment of migraine in the emergency room, which may involve use of...
Drugs for treatment of migraine are listed in Table 2 on page 9. Drugs for prevention of migraine are listed in Table 3 on page 10. Treatment of migraine in the emergency room, which may involve use of intravenous drugs, is not included here.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2011 Feb;9(102):7-12 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Depression and Bipolar Disorder

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 1, 2010;  (Issue 93)
Drugs are not the only treatment for mood disorders. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has a long history of efficacy and...
Drugs are not the only treatment for mood disorders. Psychotherapy remains an important component in the management of these disorders, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has a long history of efficacy and safety when drugs are ineffective, poorly tolerated or cannot be used. Some drugs are recommended here for indications that have not been approved by the FDA.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2010 May;8(93):35-42 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Milnacipran (Savella) for Fibromyalgia

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • June 15, 2009;  (Issue 1314)
Milnacipran (Savella - Forest), an oral selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), is the third drug approved by the FDA for management of fibromyalgia. The 2 others are pregabalin, a...
Milnacipran (Savella - Forest), an oral selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), is the third drug approved by the FDA for management of fibromyalgia. The 2 others are pregabalin, a gammaaminobutyric acid (GABA) analog also approved for treatment of diabetic neuropathy, post-herpetic neuralgia and epilepsy, and duloxetine, an SNRI also approved for treatment of depression, diabetic neuropathy and generalized anxiety disorder.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2009 Jun 15;51(1314):45-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Desvenlafaxine for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • May 19, 2008;  (Issue 1286)
The FDA has approved the marketing of desvenlafaxine (Pristiq - Wyeth), the main active metabolite of venlafaxine (Effexor, and others - Wyeth), for treatment of major depressive disorder. Venlafaxine, a...
The FDA has approved the marketing of desvenlafaxine (Pristiq - Wyeth), the main active metabolite of venlafaxine (Effexor, and others - Wyeth), for treatment of major depressive disorder. Venlafaxine, a norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), is available generically as an immediate-release tablet. Venlafaxine extended-release capsules (Effexor XR) are scheduled to go off-patent in 2010.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2008 May 19;50(1286):37-9 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Duloxetine (Cymbalta) for Diabetic Neuropathic Pain

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • August 15, 2005;  (Issue 1215)
Duloxetine hydrochloride (Cymbalta - Lilly), a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) available for treatment of depression, has also been approved by the FDA for treatment of...
Duloxetine hydrochloride (Cymbalta - Lilly), a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) available for treatment of depression, has also been approved by the FDA for treatment of neuropathic pain associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Duloxetine is one of two drugs approved specifically for management of neuropathic pain due to diabetes; the other, pregabalin (Lyrica - Pfizer), will be marketed soon and will be reviewed in the next issue of The Medical Letter.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2005 Aug 15;47(1215):67-8 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Duloxetine (Cymbalta): A New SNRI for Depression

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • October 11, 2004;  (Issue 1193)
Duloxetine hydrochloride (Cymbalta - Lilly), a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), has been approved by the FDA for treatment of major depressive disorder in adults, and more...
Duloxetine hydrochloride (Cymbalta - Lilly), a selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), has been approved by the FDA for treatment of major depressive disorder in adults, and more recently for diabetic peripheral neuropathy as well. The Medical Letter will review its role in diabetic neuropathy in a future issue.
Med Lett Drugs Ther. 2004 Oct 11;46(1193):81-3 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction

Drugs for Psychiatric Disorders

   
The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics • July 1, 2003;  (Issue 11)
The number of drugs marketed for psychiatric indications has increased sharply in recent years. The recommendations in this article are based on the results of controlled trials and on the experience and...
The number of drugs marketed for psychiatric indications has increased sharply in recent years. The recommendations in this article are based on the results of controlled trials and on the experience and opinions of Medical Letter consultants. Interactions with other drugs can be found in The Medical Letter Handbook of Adverse Drug Interactions, 2003.
Treat Guidel Med Lett. 2003 Jul;1(11):69-76 | Show Full IntroductionHide Full Introduction